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DNSSEC Signing for .ch and .li on the Rise

The share of DNSSEC signed domain names in .ch and .li reached 1% for the first time in June 2017. While this is still a very low number compared to other ccTLDs, the number of DNSSEC signed domain names is increasing at a high rate for the last two quarters.

DNSSEC

The Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) is a set of technologies that secures the origin authentication and data integrity of the Domain Name System. It allows to detect DNS records that have been modified on the way from the authoritative name server to the client using a domain name. This helps to protect Internet users from going to bogus websites.

In addition from protecting Internet users from cybercriminals and state sponsored actors, DNSSEC is the base for important standards such as DNS-based Authentication of Named Entities (DANE).

DNSSEC in .ch and .li

DNSSEC was enabled for the .ch and .li zones in 2010 but unfortunately received a slow adaptation by domain holders. From 2013 there was a slow but steady growth of domain names signed with DNSSEC. In November 2016 we noticed a increased rate of DNSSEC signed domain names that accelerated in April 2017.

From now on SWITCH will publish statistics about the number of signed domain names for both ccTLDs .ch and .li on the nic.ch and nic.li website.

DNSSEC Signed Domain Names in .ch   DNSSEC Signed Domain Names in .li
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Usage of .ch domain names for spamming malware Tofsee stopped

It is rare that a malware family uses .ch or .li domain names in their domain name generation algorithm (DGA). The last time I remember, that we had to take action against a malware using .ch or .li domain names was about 8 years ago. It was Conficker that infected millions of computers worldwide. The malware was generating about 500 .ch and .li domains a day to be potentially used as a command and control server. By then SWITCH joined the conficker working group to prevent the use of domain names by this malware.

Since then we have been watching the use of .ch and .li domain names in malware DGAs and prepared for this by making an agreement with the Registrar of Last Resort (RoLR) to prevent the registration of domain names used in DGA algorithms of malware.

This week the Swiss Govermental Computer Emergency Response Team (GovCERT) informed us about the malware Tofsee using .ch as one of the TLDs in its DGA. Continue reading


A file that wasn’t there

One of our minions (he was introduced in this blog entry a while ago) recently came to us asking for advice: he was about to automate yet another task, by using his Python-fu, and realized that he misses entries in the file system as well as in the registry.

Notably, he only sees this behaviour on 64bit-versions of the Windows operating system:

Windows Explorer (64bit) vs Python application (32bit)

Left: Windows Explorer (64bit) lists several folders and files.   Right: Python application (32bit) only lists the folder Microsoft.

The left image shows the folder C:\Windows\System32\Tasks as seen in the Windows Explorer, the right image as seen in a simple 32bit-python application. Only the subfolder Microsoft is listed there. Something is amiss.

 

Below is the code to produce the right image, when executed in a 32bit-version of Python:

import glob, os
for pathfilename in glob.glob(r"C:\Windows\System32\Tasks\*"):
    print pathfilename

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