SWITCH Security-Blog

SWITCH-CERT IT-Security Blog


2 Comments

DNSSEC signing your domain with BIND 9.16

BIND 9.16 has improved DNSSEC support to the point where it can (finally) be called simple to use. This is excellent news for DNS administrators because it means there are now several options (viable alternatives being Knot DNS or PowerDNS) which make DNSSEC simple to deploy.

Six years ago we wrote a blog post about BIND 9.9 and its new in-line signing support. This article got a lot of views but at some point we had to put a warning message on the blog post stating vaguely that we would not recommend the method described anymore. The main reason was that DNSSEC with BIND 9.9 still contained many manual steps which could not be configured in named.conf. Especially key roll-overs caused headaches for administrators. If you cannot upgrade to BIND 9.16 the old blog post might still be useful. But in this case, we recommend to omit key roll-overs altogether.

However, now that we have BIND 9.16, you can just make some configuration changes to named.conf and it’s all done. Now let’s take a closer look on how you can enable DNSSEC for your domain name.

OS Setup

We used Debian 10 (aka buster) which comes with BIND 9.11 at the time of writing. We used the BIND9 packages provided by ISC, who offer BIND 9.16 in the “BIND 9 Stable” repository. Please head over to ISC Packages for BIND 9 for instructions on how to use the ISC packages directly.

Once you have added the ISC BIND 9 Stable repository we install bind9, bind9 utils and the bind documentation:

apt-get install bind9 bind9-dnsutils bind9-doc

You have now a running bind9 instance. You can check its running state with systemctl:

systemctl status bind9

Continue reading


Leave a comment

The .ch zone file will be published as open data

The Swiss Federal council adopted the lower laws to the telecommunicaiton act today. Amongst it is the Ordinance on Internet Domains that also regulates the ccTLD .ch. SWITCH-CERT welcomes the new ordinance and the smart regulation by the Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM). The Ordinance on Internet Domains will come to power on 1.1.2021 and has some important changes.

The most obvious ist that the personal data of domain holders will no longer be published in the public whois, following other European countries and the GDPR. This is an important change to protect the privacy of Domain holders. There will be a regulated and monitored access for Swiss Authorities and others that require that data for fighting cybercrime or have other legitimate reasons to get access to the identity of a domain holder. You can find more information on the SWITCH website.

Not so obvious, but from the CERT and security persepective as important is that the .ch zone file will be published as a whole. While the data about (active) .ch domains itself has been published in the distributed Domain Name System ever since, the file containing all domain names – the .ch “zone” – was never public. This will change as of January 2021, details on how to access the .ch zone file will be published at the SWITCH open data page soon.

The .ch zone file contains all registered .ch domain names that have a NS record that points to the nameserver that gives authoritative answers for that domain name. If a domain is registered but has no NS record, it will not be published in the .ch zone file and cannot be resolved, the domain is not active, the website and email are not reachable by Internet users. The .ch zone file is an entry point to query all active .ch domain names for domain data at the authoritative nameserver. This data contains the (IP) addresses for webservers, for email and other public reachable services. It also contains information about who runs the infrastructure and allows the mapping to a country or geolocation. It is also visible which new technologies like IPv6 are used or what security features (DNSSEC, DANE, SPF, DMARC) are used or which Certificate Authority is indicated. This gives direct information about technological and economic details for all active .ch domain names. All this is already done by different initiatives. The publishing of the .ch zone file will give the possibility to make these data collection on .ch domain names complete.

Zone files of most TLDs are available. Generic TLDs (gTLDs) like .org and .com have to publish their zone file via ICANNs Centralized Zone Data System (CZDS) and also some other ccTLD registiries publish their zone file.

One of the possibilities with this information is to see recently activated domain names. This allows security researchers and authorities to monitor these names for potential harmfull activities like phishing or online fraud. This allows security researchers and authorities to monitor these names for potential harmfull activities like phishing or online fraud. Having access to the .ch zone file, they can react fast on malicious registrations and prevent damages for Internet users.

But fighting cybercrime was not the only reason to publish the .ch zone. Switzerland has a law on Open-Government-Data-Strategy that follows the open-by-default strategy. As the zone file contains no personal data, the publishing of the .ch zone file is in line with that law and we hope that open data researchers, public archives and others that look a the Swiss Internet can make use of this data for the public interest. We think that the .ch zone file is an important piece of information to better understand the economic, social and technological impact of the digital transformation in Switzerland. As almost everything in the Internet uses a domain name, changes in domain names can be important signals to detect ongoing or historic changes.

We welcome and encourage any public archives of historic and derived data by organisations and individuals who can add value to the .ch zone file. If you publish data like scan results or statistics, please let us know at cert@switch.ch.

 


Leave a comment

Growing support for open security standards in Switzerland

Open security standards are essential for a secure and resilient Internet in Switzerland and protect the privacy of Swiss Internet users. The adoption rate for Internet security standards like DNSSEC, DANE and DMARC in Switzerland is still low compared to the leading countries in Europe, but there is more and more support from the Internet industry, authorities and not for profit organizations in Switzerland.

Why are open security standards so important?

The implementation of open security standards that come out of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), reduce the attack surface of the domain/service owner. But even more important, a growing implementation rate reduces the attack surface of the internet as a whole and makes the life of cyber criminals and state actors more challenging. Open security standards provide different mechanisms to secure our communication on the internet, most important encryption and authentication. Encryption keeps our communication on the internet confidential and prevents third parties from reading our emails and tracking on which web sites users spend their time. Authentication allows us to identify and authenticate our communications partners, it makes sure that we are not on a fake website or send emails or our login credentials to a rogue email server. Continue reading


100’000 .ch domain names are secured with DNSSEC!

Imagine you want to visit your online banking website «www.example-bank.ch». Now, instead of getting the correct IP address your computer gets manipulated information and connects you to a website that is owned by a criminal. You wouldn’t notice but disclose your online banking credentials to the attacker.

Luckily, DNSSEC is here to help. The extension of DNS protects you from being misled and helps you reach exactly the address you typed into your browser. A complex cryptographic process makes sure, that you’re always at the right place.

100’000 .ch domain names are signed with DNSSEC

In late December 2019 the .ch zone achieved a milestone with 100’000 DNSSEC secured domains. DNSSEC adds digital signatures to DNS answers and helps to mitigate attacks on DNS name resolution.

The percentage of .ch domain names that are signed is still below 5%, but is rising thanks to a few registrars like Infomaniak, OVH, Firestorm and netzone that sign domain names for their customers by default. The number of DNSSEC signed .ch domain names rose  54% from 1.1.2019 to 1.1.2020.

By January 1st 2020 the .ch zone contained 100’065 domain names that are secured with DNSSEC

Top .ch domain names are just average regarding domain name security

Continue reading


SWITCH Public DNS Resolver

SWITCH operates recursive name servers for its constituency, the Swiss research and education network. Over the last year we have continually added support for transport encryption protocols on our recursive name servers such as DNS over TLS (DoT) and more recently DNS over HTTPS (DoH).

In contrast to default unencrypted DNS which runs over UDP/TCP Port 53 , both of these standards (DoT, DoH) use encrypted protocols which provide privacy for DNS queries between the client (application) and the recursive name server. This eliminates opportunities for eavesdropping and on-path tampering with DNS queries on the network.

Our motivation for enabling encrypted DNS protocols on our recursive name servers have been that some client applications (mostly Android 9) probe for DoT support and use it if available by default. Over the last year, other widely used applications have added support for encrypted DNS protocols. Most notably the web browser Mozilla Firefox which supports DoH but has not turned it on by default.

Opportunistic encryption of DNS queries and responses as it is used by Android 9 by default is one use case of DoT. However, some users want to pin a specific recursive name server regardless in which network they are or also to authenticate the name server. To support this use case, we have opened our recursive name servers over encrypted transport protocols to the Internet. You will find more information about the SWITCH Public DNS service and how to use it on this website:

https://www.switch.ch/security/info/public-dns/

Continue reading


Attacks on DNS continue, targets are also in Switzerland

Attacks on the domain name system continue

Talos, the intelligence group of CISCO reported in their blog that their monitoring shows that attacks on the domain name system (DNS) by “Sea Turtle” continue.  The attack technique used is similar than before, the actors compromise name server records to take ownership of the domain. They then provide false information to selected parties (e.g certificate authorities, mail users) which leads to the disclosure of email credentials of the targeted organisations. These credentials give initial access to the victims E-mails accounts and other resources and are a starting point for further attacks.

Victims in Switzerland

For the first time, Talos also reported victims in Switzerland.

Geographic Location of Sea Turtle Victims by Talos

While Talos didn’t disclose the targeted organizations they identified these groups as primary targets:

  • Government organizations
  • Energy companies
  • Think tanks
  • International non-governmental organizations
  • At least one airport

Continue reading


1 Comment

DNSSEC Usage in Switzerland is on the rise after widespread attacks on the Domain Name System

Attacks on the DNS System

Cyber attacks on the DNS system are not new. Cache poisoning, Domain Hijacking and BGP injections of routes to public DNS resolvers happen regularly, but they usually don’t get much attention as they target the Internet’s core infrastructure and are not directly visible to end users in most cases. This time it was different. The recent widespread DNS hijacking attacks on several Mid East, North African and European and North American governments and infrastructure providers, published by Ciscos Talos showed that DNS attacks are a real threat to cyber security. Netnod, one of the affected infrastructure providers issued a statement, that called, amongst other domain security mechanisms, for the implementation of the DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC).

The analysis of these attacks also convinced the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) that there is an ongoing and significant risk to key parts of the System (DNS) infrastructure. ICANN issued a call for “Full DNSSEC Deployment to Protect the Internet” across all unsecured domain names.

The question is if  these attacks and the awareness that DNSSEC is an absolute essential base layer protection for domain names had some effects on the Implementation of DNSSEC Switzerland?

More DNSSEC signed domain names

As a ccTLD operator SWITCH publishes the number of DNSSEC signed .ch and .li domain names every month. While the number of signed domain names is still very low at around 3-4% we see a rise in the numbers of signed domain names for two years now.

DNSSEC signed .ch domain names 1.4.2019

Continue reading


Top 1000 .ch Domain Names

UPDATE 19.02.2019:

From February 2019 on there will be a few small changes. A co-worker, Antoine, has discovered a flaw in the current measurement of the top 1000 .ch domain names which has been removed by now. Since we only counted the number of distinct IP addresses per domain for both IP versions, using IPv6 one can easily send queries from a whole /64 range which results in approximately 1.8*10^19 different addresses. Being a private customer of the Swiss ISP Init7 even gives you an entire /48 range. Like that you can easily push a domain name to the top! In order to prevent this from happening we will now count the distinct number of ASes per domain.

Additionally, we will provide 2 lists from now on. One that contains a ranking based on ALL queries, i.e. including queries that have returned NXDOMAIN, and one whithout those NXDOMAIN queries. Previously, we just provided the former. Continue reading


Additional DNSSEC Training with PowerDNS on May 7 and 8

We announced 3 one day DNS trainings in the end of February and all three trainings where fully booked within 24 hours. We are happy to see so much demand for DNSSEC in Switzerland.
We managed to add two more dates for the DNSSEC training together with PowerDNS
The training will be given at the following dates in Zurich:

7.5. Zurich, SWITCH
8.5. Zurich, SWITCH

The one day training will give you an introduction into DNSSEC and show you how to sign DNS zones on an autoritative DNS server.
We will use PowerDNS for the practical and hands on part. PowerDNS contains support for DNSSEC, enabling the easy serving of DNSSEC secured data, with minimal administrative overhead.

Agenda:

• Short introduction to DNSSEC
• how DNSSEC works
• keys / signatures / NSEC / NSEC3
• Working with DNSSEC and the PowerDNS Authoritative server
• Short overview over PowerDNS Authoritative server backends (MySQL, PostgreSQL, BIND, pipe, …)
• DNSSEC signing
• Pre-signed zones
• CDS
• Zone transfers
• Utilities (pdnsutil)
• The PowerDNS ALIAS record (and its future)

Required skills: Unix system administrator skills and DNS server know how.The training will be delivered in english.

More information and registration here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dnssec-training-zurich-may-7-tickets-44474772241
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dnssec-training-zurich-may-8-tickets-44474795310


A Day in the Life of nic.ch

Ever wondered what the DNS traffic looks like on a usual day on a .ch name server? This article briefly sketches the landscape of systems querying .ch domains. To be exact, the following statistics and statements are based on a small subset of the overall data since the underlying sources just consist of 2 out of 8 name servers, i.e. a.nic.ch and b.nic.ch.  Overall the .ch zone consists of 8 name servers distributed all over the world. While some of them are setup as anycast network, others are set up traditionally as unicast servers located in a single data center.

We capture the DNS traffic as pcaps and subsequently process and store it with the help of Entrada which relies on HDFS and Impala. Currently, we operate a Hadoop cluster with 7 data nodes which provides us with a good basis for future in-depth analysis.

The following sections discuss two statistics that we publish on www.nic.ch in greater detail.

Who queries the name servers?

To start with, let’s have a look at who queries our name servers. Figure 1 shows the top 10 countries in terms of generated DNS traffic observed during week 4 of 2018. Additionally, the share of distinct IP addresses per country is displayed with a second bar. Since the original DNS traffic does not contain explicit information about the country where the query originates from this information is being added by Entrada with the help of the Maxmind database. To have a more representative image of the DNS landscape, Google resolvers and OpenDNS resolvers are excluded from this statistic.  Although from the queries themselves one cannot be sure about the nature of the querying system, for convenience, throughout this article we’ll call those systems resolvers.

top_ten_countries.png

Figure 1

Continue reading


5 Comments

DNSSEC training with PowerDNS in Switzerland

SWITCH is organising a one day DNSSEC training together with PowerDNS

The training will be given at the following dates:

9.4. Zurich, SWITCH
10.4. Bern, Uni
11.4. Carouge HESGE

The one day training will give you an introduction into DNSSEC and show you how to sign DNS zones on an autoritative DNS server.
We will use PowerDNS for the practical and hands on part. PowerDNS contains support for DNSSEC, enabling the easy serving of DNSSEC secured data, with minimal administrative overhead.

Agenda:

• Short introduction to DNSSEC
• how DNSSEC works
• keys / signatures / NSEC / NSEC3
• Working with DNSSEC and the PowerDNS Authoritative server
• Short overview over PowerDNS Authoritative server backends (MySQL, PostgreSQL, BIND, pipe, …)
• DNSSEC signing
• Pre-signed zones
• Zone transfers
• Utilities (pdnsutil)
• The PowerDNS ALIAS record (and its future)

Required skills: Unix system administrator skills and DNS server know how.The training will be delivered in english.

More information and registration here:

Zurich: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dnssec-training-zurich-tickets-43350331007
Bern: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dnssec-training-bern-tickets-43592055010
Carouge: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dnssec-training-carouge-tickets-43592840359

Update 28.2.2018: All three trainings are fully booked after only 24 hours. We are happy to see so much interest in DNSSEC in Switzerland. Waitlist is now open.


A new issue of our SWITCH Security Report is available!

Dear Reader!

A new issue of our bi-monthly SWITCH Security Report is available!

The topics covered in this report are:

  • Dresscode for apps in the Google Play Store: malicious
  • Quad9 – does it offer a data protection-friendly alternative to Google DNS?
  • Uber’s customer and driver data on a highway to the Dark Net
  • An earful of espionage: when headphones become listening devices

The Security Report is available in both English and German.

»»  Download the english report.      »»  Download the german report.


1 Comment

Breaking security controls using subdomain hijacking

Users obtain a domain name to establish a unique identity on the Internet. Domain names are not only used to serve names and addresses of computers and services but also to store security controls, such as SPF or CAA records. Many of the Internet protocols were designed at a time where built-in security was not a requirement. The IETF continues to standardize protocol extensions to address today’s security needs.

For some protocols security is added with controls stored in your domain names zone file. In order to have the desired effect, the pre-condition is of course that your domain name is secure. In other words, the security of your application that makes use of controls in DNS is only as secure as the security of your domain name.

Hijacking a domain name because of weak credentials at the registrar may get the job done but this is far from stealthy and will likely not last long. In many cases it is sufficient to hijack an abandoned subdomain. Taking over abandoned subdomains may be unnoticed by the owner for a very long period of time making it also very useful for targeted attacks.

Picture 1: update.ft.com has been hijacked and the content from the ft.com front page is mirrored with a fake article about subdomain hijacking. Note: the website is not online anymore, Financial Times has been notified to remove the abandoned record from their zone file. A Certificate Transparency (CT) log proves that a TLS certificate has been issued for this demo site.

Continue reading


1 Comment

11th October 2017, DNSSEC key rollover of the root zone, be ready the key is here!

On the 27th September, ICANN announced the postponement for the KSK rollover. More information can be found here.

written by Yves Bovard

No, this is not a kind of secret message nor a new ice-cream. On 11th October 2017 the root zone will be signed with a new key. Ladies and gentlemen, update your DNS resolver. As of July 11th, the new key is published in the root zone and your resolver should start updating its trust anchors automatically!

Continue reading


16 Comments

94 .ch & .li domain names hijacked and used for drive-by

A Swiss domain holder called us today telling us that the .ch zone points to the wrong name servers for his domain.

The NS entries were ns1.dnshost[.]ga and ns2.dnshost[.]ga. We contacted the registrar and soon realized that this is not the only domain that had unauthorized changes. We identified 93 additional .ch and .li domain names that pointed to the two rogue name servers. While domain hijacking by pointing to a rogue NS is a known attack,  94 domains on a single day is very unusual. So we analyzed what the hijacked domains were used for and soon found out that they are used to infect internet users with malware.

Visitors to the hijacked domains were redirected to the Keitaro TDS (traffic distribution system):

hXXp://46.183.219[.]227/VWcjj6

A TDS decides where to redirect the visitor to, often depending on its IP address (i.e. country),
user agent and operating system.

A dead end may look like the following:

hXXp//46.183.219[.]227/favicon.ico
hXXp://46.183.219[.]227/www.bingo.com

And the visitor will be redirected to Google.

However, in some cases, the visitor is redirected to the Rig Exploit Kit:

hXXp://188.225.87[.]223/?doctor&news=...&;money=...&cars=236&medicine=3848
hXXp://188.225.87[.]223/?health&news=...
...

And the visitor gets infected.

The payload is Neutrino Bot:

MD5: a32f3d0a71a16a461ad94c5bee695988
SHA256: 492081097c78d784be3996d3b823a660f52e0632410ffb2a2a225bd1ec60973d).

It gets in touch with its command and control server and grabs additional modules:

hXXp://poer23[.]tk/tasks.php
hXXp://poer23[.]tk/modules/nn_grabber_x32.dll
hXXp://poer23[.]tk/modules/nn_grabber_x64.dll

A little later, it also gets an update

hXXp//www.araop[.]tk/test.exe

MD5: 7c2864ce7aa0fff3f53fa191c2e63b59
SHA256: c1d60c9fff65bbd0e3156a249ad91873f1719986945f50759b3479a258969b38)

Status

The rogue NS were inserted in the .ch zone file at around 13:00 today. The registrar discovered soon what happened and rolled back the unauthorized changes. At 16:00 all of the changes in the .ch & .li zone were reverted and the NS records pointed to the legitimate name servers again.

[Update 10.7.17 17:15]

Gandi the registrar of the 94 domain names has written a blog post, as well as SCRT the domain holder that initially informed us about the domain name hijacking of scrt.ch. SCRT also showed how Strict Transport Security protected their recurring visitors from being redirected to the bogus website!