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IT-Security-Links #66

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DNSSEC signing your domain with BIND inline signing

Update Nov 2017: DNSSEC zone signing as described here is outdated. We strongly recommend against the method described in this blog post. Newer BIND versions or other DNS software have greatly simplified DNSSEC signing.

With BIND 9.9, ISC introduced a new inline signing option for BIND 9. In earlier versions of BIND, you had to use the dnssec-signzone utility to sign your zone. With inline signing, however, BIND refreshes your signatures automatically, while you can still work on the unsigned zone file to make your changes.

This blog post explains how you can set up your zone with BIND inline signing. The zone we are using is called example.com. In addition, we look at how to roll over your keys. In our example, we do a Zone Signing Key (ZSK) rollover. We expect that you are already familiar with ISC BIND and have a basic understanding of DNSSEC. More specifically, you should be able to set up an authoritative-only name server and have read up on DNSSEC and maybe used some of its functions already.

Architecture

Before we set up inline signing with BIND, let us look at a typical network architecture. We will set up inline signing on a hidden master name server. This server is only reachable from the Internet via one or more publicly reachable secondary name servers. We will only cover the configuration of the hidden master as the secondary name server configuration will not differ for the signed zone (assuming you are using DNSSEC-capable name server software).
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The November 2014 issue of our SWITCH Security Report is available!

A new issue of our monthly SWITCH Security Report has just been released.

The topics covered in this report are:

  • The «long tail» effect of Shellshock, Heartbleed & co.
  • Malvertising: hackers learning from advertising professionals
  • Legitimate defence of the right to protection versus opening Pandora’s box
  • Taxing the Net: a Hungarian posse gets serious
  • The Clipboard: Interesting Presentations, Articles and Videos

The Security Report is available in both english and german language.

»»  Download the english report.      »»  Download the german report.

Did you miss our previous Security Report? Click here to go to the archive.

 


Retefe with a new twist

A few months ago, we blogged about the banking trojan Retefe (Blog post in German) that was and still is targeting Switzerland. First off, Retefe is different because it only targets Switzerland, Austria and Sweden (and sometimes Japan). Contrast this to many other banking Trojans, which have a much more global and dynamic target list. Not only that, but the Retefe infrastructure also prevents computers from not affected countries to connect to its systems by using geo-location aware access lists and filters. The second unique property of Retefe is the fact, that it only modifies the operating system by adding a fake root certificate and by changing the DNS server for domain name resolution. After infection, the installer removes itself, which makes life hard for anti-virus software trying to detect a malicious Retefe component or activity.

Since a few days, Retefe is back again with a new twist. It still targets the same countries and the same banks. Not too exciting, the spam campaign has changed. However, in this wave Retefe is picky and only installs itself on selected computers. And some icing to the cake, it also installs another malware called DOFOIL. In this blog post, we give a technical analysis of the new Retefe.
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