SWITCH Security-Blog

SWITCH-CERT IT-Security Blog


Protect your network with DNS Firewall

If you run your own mail server, you will quickly find out that 90% of the e-mails you receive are spam. The solution to this problem is e-mail filtering, which rejects or deletes unwanted spam. This solution is generally well accepted, and most users would not want the old days back when your inbox was filled with scams. Those people who want spam can also work around it by disabling spam filtering for their e-mail address or opting to run their own mail server.

Spam, scammers and other malicious abuse are not unique to e-mail. One possible approach is to invent a filtering technology for every protocol or service and allow the service owners to block misuse according to their policy. On the other hand, most services on the Internet make use of the Domain Name System (DNS). If you control DNS name resolution for your organisation, you can filter out the bad stuff the same way you filter out spam on e-mail. The difference and the advantage of DNS is that DNS filtering is independent of the service you use.

Back in 2010, ISC and Paul Vixie invented a technology called Response Policy Zones (RPZ) (See CircleID Post Taking back the DNS). While it has always been possible to block certain domain names from being resolved on your DNS resolver, adding host names manually as an authoritative zone does not scale.

(Illustration Christoph Frei)

(Illustration Christoph Frei)

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Drive-by code and Phishing on Swiss websites in 2014

In 2014, about 1,800 Swiss websites were cleaned from drive-by code, compared with 2,700 in 2013, a decline of 33%. At the same time, the number of phishing cases affecting .ch and .li top-level domains rose from only a handful in 2013 to more than 300.

Drive-by code on Swiss websites in 2014

Last year, 35,796 suspicious drive-by URLs in the .ch and .li top-level domains were reported to SWITCH. Security experts from SWITCH-CERT automatically sent requests to these servers and analysed the responses, looking for malicious code injected into the HTML source code. When an expert identified malicious code, the registrar or domain name holder and the web hoster were notified and asked to remove it within one working day. This was done for 1,839 domain names in 2014. In 1,493 (81%) cases, the code was removed by the web hoster or domain holder within one day. For the other 346 domains, the deadline was not met, and the domain name was temporarily suspended to prevent further damage to website visitors. Some 264 (14%) of the infected websites were cleaned of malicious code, with the remaining 82 domain names having to be reactivated after five days, the maximum suspension time by law. A request for identification was sent to the holders of all 82 domains, resulting in an additional 59 (3.2%) of websites being cleaned. A total of 23 (1.3% of all notified) domain names were deleted after 30 days because the domain holder failed to respond to the identification request.

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Compromised .ch and .li websites used for drive-by infections by quarter

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The December 2014 issue of our SWITCH Security Report is available!

Dear Reader!

A new issue of our monthly SWITCH Security Report has just been released.

The topics covered in this report are:

  • No «Land of the Free» in sight: NSA allowed to continue gathering data, BND puts forward EUR 300 million wish list
  • Censorship culture in the UK
  • The new PR: how parties, companies and organisations manipulate web chat to propagate opinions
  • Regin and the Detekt-ives: new software finds known government Trojans – Symantec discovers a new one
  • Generali cheaper: lower premiums in exchange for personal information
  • The Clipboard: Interesting Presentations, Articles and Videos

The Security Report is available in both english and german language.

»»  Download the english report.      »»  Download the german report.

Did you miss our previous Security Report? Click here to go to the archive.

 


Retefe with a new twist

A few months ago, we blogged about the banking trojan Retefe (Blog post in German) that was and still is targeting Switzerland. First off, Retefe is different because it only targets Switzerland, Austria and Sweden (and sometimes Japan). Contrast this to many other banking Trojans, which have a much more global and dynamic target list. Not only that, but the Retefe infrastructure also prevents computers from not affected countries to connect to its systems by using geo-location aware access lists and filters. The second unique property of Retefe is the fact, that it only modifies the operating system by adding a fake root certificate and by changing the DNS server for domain name resolution. After infection, the installer removes itself, which makes life hard for anti-virus software trying to detect a malicious Retefe component or activity.

Since a few days, Retefe is back again with a new twist. It still targets the same countries and the same banks. Not too exciting, the spam campaign has changed. However, in this wave Retefe is picky and only installs itself on selected computers. And some icing to the cake, it also installs another malware called DOFOIL. In this blog post, we give a technical analysis of the new Retefe.
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IT-Security-Links #65


Swiss economy makes online security its priority

Switzerland is one of the safest countries in the world. To make also the Internet a secure place in Switzerland, the Swiss online economy has started the Swiss Internet Security Alliance (SISA). The goal of the alliance is to make Switzerland the “cleanest” Internet country in the world! The organization launched an online security check today which allows internet users to clean and protect their systems.

Offering more security
The founding of the Swiss Internet Security Alliance is a sign of its members’ commitment to making the Internet a secure place in Switzerland. The association brings together expert knowledge from representatives of various sectors and promotes information-sharing amongst competitors.

Overcoming challenges together
The Swiss Internet Security Alliance focuses on its main assets – the knowledge, experience and technical expertise of its members. Its members asut, Centralway, credit suisse, cyscon Schweiz, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hostpoint, Migros Bank, PostFinance, Raiffeisen, Sunrise, Swisscard, Swisscom, SWITCH, UBS, upc cablecom and Viseca have longstanding experience in dealing with online security.  The association is open to other interested parties. More information can be found in the press release:

https://www.switch.ch/about/news/2014/sisa.html

Comprehensive security check
Upon founding the association, the Swiss Internet Security Alliance is launching a security check. The Swiss Security Check provides protection on three levels.

  1. Users with outdated or incorrectly configured software who are therefore subject to a security risk, will find this out within seconds.
  2. If there is suspicion of malware, the malware cleaner helps with the diagnosis and resolution of the problems.
  3. A cyber vaccine completes the protection and keeps electronic pests at bay.

 

The Swiss Security Check is free and can be accessed here:
http://www.swiss-isa.ch

 

Please follow @swiss_isa on Twitter!

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IT-Security-Links #62